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SAWCE
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Thu Jun 28, 2018 1:05 pm

Since none of us have made any claims of being 100% Native American, that means that all of our families were at some point immigrants to this fine nation. Do you know the story of how your family came to be here in America (or Canada for Tarspin)? Let's hear them...
:sawce:

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troyguitar
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Thu Jun 28, 2018 1:07 pm

I sadly don't know how any of my family got here, AFAIK my parents don't know either. Dat lost history.

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Thu Jun 28, 2018 1:15 pm

My parents were the first generation of the bloodline to settle in the United States. They moved from Romania to the US with the help of the Diversity Visa program, which they won the “lottery” for. This means that their path to citizenship was almost free, expedited, and they were protected from deportation pending they didn’t get in trouble criminally.

Romanian high school diplomas, no college, and some sheer luck helped them become fairly “well off” for their level of experience & education, knowledge of US society, and overall circumstances.

My mother definitely has a stronger work ethic than my father, as she has become more ambitious and she has climbed up rank at many companies, whereas my dad owns his own business and he is an “owner-operator” that deals with logistics and transit.

I am their only child, and as such I receive some spoilage and other “shit” for being a good kid with a good head on his shoulders. I am fortunate that my ambition and ethic helped me become the person I am because my parents, help me as they may, did not grow up here so I had to learn some stuff about schools, programs, career paths, etc myself. If I’ll have kids they’ll be better off for it than I was, and I ended up just fine.

I will second the comments made in OT before the topic was created: hard work pays off. The ability to compromise, sacrifice, and make yourself valuable to a company pays off immensely in the long run. Play the long game. That’s what I’m doing. Hopefully I can make, by myself, what my parents made combined in income before I reach their age. If I can swing $180,000/year in income before 40, I’ll be damned happy.

A non-filtered look into the truth of generation improving on generation.
:doughnut: :narc: :doughnut:
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Thu Jun 28, 2018 1:19 pm

razr390 wrote:
Thu Jun 28, 2018 1:15 pm
My parents were the first generation of the bloodline to settle in the United States. They moved from Romania to the US with the help of the Diversity Visa program, which they won the “lottery” for. This means that their path to citizenship was almost free, expedited, and they were protected from deportation pending they didn’t get in trouble criminally.

Romanian high school diplomas, no college, and some sheer luck helped them become fairly “well off” for their level of experience & education, knowledge of US society, and overall circumstances.

My mother definitely has a stronger work ethic than my father, as she has become more ambitious and she has climbed up rank at many companies, whereas my dad owns his own business and he is an “owner-operator” that deals with logistics and transit.

I am their only child, and as such I receive some spoilage and other “shit” for being a good kid with a good head on his shoulders. I am fortunate that my ambition and ethic helped me become the person I am because my parents, help me as they may, did not grow up here so I had to learn some stuff about schools, programs, career paths, etc myself. If I’ll have kids they’ll be better off for it than I was, and I ended up just fine.

I will second the comments made in OT before the topic was created: hard work pays off. The ability to compromise, sacrifice, and make yourself valuable to a company pays off immensely in the long run. Play the long game. That’s what I’m doing. Hopefully I can make, by myself, what my parents made combined in income before I reach their age. If I can swing $180,000/year in income before 40, I’ll be damned happy.

A non-filtered look into the truth of generation improving on generation.
:bravo:
5/7 story.
:wap: Where are these mangos?

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Thu Jun 28, 2018 1:22 pm

My mom is big on genealogy, and has traced our family history on her side back to the 1700's IIRC. I'll have to check with her on when her side came to America. Her lineage is mostly English and Scottish, with some other western European lines mixed in.

Dad's side came over much later, during WWII. Both of his parents are from Germany and found themselves in a concentration camp during WWII for being members of the Mormon church. I don't know the story of how, but they managed to escape and flee to Cananda where they lived for a while. My grandfather became a journalist after that and spent a lot of time travelling Central and South America reporting and helping establish news companies down there. Each of my aunts and uncles were born in different countries down there, Brazil, Argentina, and Peru, with my dad being born in Mexico where he was raised until he was 8 years old. They eventually all returned to Canada, and then moved to Washintonville, NY when my dad was a young teenager.

My grandfather left my grandmother shortly after that, and he and my dad had a strained relationship. I only remember seeing him a few times as a child and teenager (he passed when I was about 18), and never knew about his and my grandmother's escape from Germany until after she passed and one of my cousins who was close to her told me about it. I wish I'd known more and had been able to talk to them and learn about and from their experience.
:sawce:

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Thu Jun 28, 2018 1:29 pm

My mom's side of the Family is French (Grandfather) and English (Grandmother). Both families came over late 1870's and settled in central Illinois. My grandparents grew up on farms during the depression. My dad's side is German, from Ohio. I've found their records from census-es that are now unsealed. That's about as far as I've gone.

I need to do my damn 23 and Me test.
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I've been featured on the cover of Poverty Illustrated 4 times.

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Thu Jun 28, 2018 1:30 pm

SAWCE wrote:
Thu Jun 28, 2018 1:22 pm
My mom is big on genealogy, and has traced our family history on her side back to the 1700's IIRC. I'll have to check with her on when her side came to America. Her lineage is mostly English and Scottish, with some other western European lines mixed in.

Dad's side came over much later, during WWII. Both of his parents are from Germany and found themselves in a concentration camp during WWII for being members of the Mormon church. I don't know the story of how, but they managed to escape and flee to Cananda where they lived for a while. My grandfather became a journalist after that and spent a lot of time travelling Central and South America reporting and helping establish news companies down there. Each of my aunts and uncles were born in different countries down there, Brazil, Argentina, and Peru, with my dad being born in Mexico where he was raised until he was 8 years old. They eventually all returned to Canada, and then moved to Washintonville, NY when my dad was a young teenager.

My grandfather left my grandmother shortly after that, and he and my dad had a strained relationship. I only remember seeing him a few times as a child and teenager (he passed when I was about 18), and never knew about his and my grandmother's escape from Germany until after she passed and one of my cousins who was close to her told me about it. I wish I'd known more and had been able to talk to them and learn about and from their experience.
5/7

That’s so :fuckyeah:

Can you imagine. If none of this happened as it did you might not have been here as we know you? That’s always the thing that fucks with me hard. Which is why I’m always a bit like “everything happens for a reason” as long as I’m not being an idiot
:doughnut: :narc: :doughnut:
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Thu Jun 28, 2018 1:42 pm

razr390 wrote:
Thu Jun 28, 2018 1:30 pm
SAWCE wrote:
Thu Jun 28, 2018 1:22 pm
My mom is big on genealogy, and has traced our family history on her side back to the 1700's IIRC. I'll have to check with her on when her side came to America. Her lineage is mostly English and Scottish, with some other western European lines mixed in.

Dad's side came over much later, during WWII. Both of his parents are from Germany and found themselves in a concentration camp during WWII for being members of the Mormon church. I don't know the story of how, but they managed to escape and flee to Cananda where they lived for a while. My grandfather became a journalist after that and spent a lot of time travelling Central and South America reporting and helping establish news companies down there. Each of my aunts and uncles were born in different countries down there, Brazil, Argentina, and Peru, with my dad being born in Mexico where he was raised until he was 8 years old. They eventually all returned to Canada, and then moved to Washintonville, NY when my dad was a young teenager.

My grandfather left my grandmother shortly after that, and he and my dad had a strained relationship. I only remember seeing him a few times as a child and teenager (he passed when I was about 18), and never knew about his and my grandmother's escape from Germany until after she passed and one of my cousins who was close to her told me about it. I wish I'd known more and had been able to talk to them and learn about and from their experience.
5/7

That’s so :fuckyeah:

Can you imagine. If none of this happened as it did you might not have been here as we know you? That’s always the thing that fucks with me hard. Which is why I’m always a bit like “everything happens for a reason” as long as I’m not being an idiot
Oh yeah, 100%. And such small things could have made that change so easy. Either they didn’t convert to Mormonism when it was introduced to them, or they denounced it to save themselves from the concentration camps. Boom. I’d easily have been born in Germany instead of over here.
:sawce:

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Thu Jun 28, 2018 1:51 pm

Im 95% English according to DNA resluts. My family was in the country before the country existed. Maryland specifically. Came over during the 1600s with the Catholic migration as it was a safe place.

Around the revolutionary was the fan moved to Central KY where there are still a bunch of Catholics.

So I ain't no fucking immigrant, the USA immigrated on me!

No one is native to America. It's just up for debate to who got here first
Last edited by KYGTIGuy on Thu Jun 28, 2018 2:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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wap
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Thu Jun 28, 2018 1:53 pm

5/7 thread idea, :sawce: !

I know vastly more about my mother's side so that is the story I'll tell here.

Her father (my grandfather, obviously) who was born around 1885, was a well to do gentleman business owner in the capital town of an idyllic Greek island at the turn of the last century. Horse-drawn carriages, local opera house, casino, top hat, white gloves, etc.
Pic of said town for reference:
Image
Anyway, the town experienced an outbreak of something, I think flu, and a sister died. Since he was single, this prompted him to come to the US to find his brother to let him know. He came through Ellis Island and some years ago we paid for a plaque there with his name on it. This was in 1909. He was a young man and traveled around looking for work and his brother. He took a job working for the railroad and ended up in a town called Prescott, Oregon, on a crew laying down track. Remember, this was a time when the transcontinental RR was still fairly new and was expanding rapidly. He was made a foreman since he could speak English. He did this for a while and eventually ended up in Chicago where his brother was living and he ended up staying. He eventually entered (what else?) the restaurant business and ran a very successful 3 star restaurant in Greektown. We have an old restaurant guide book from the time with a glowing review of his place. Al Capone's sister was a regular. He eventually befriended a family who had a young daughter. He waited for her to grow up and once she became an adult (around 20 yo) they got married in 1925. He was about 20 years older! They had a priest and a bishop at the wedding and rumor has it that the bishop got drunk at the reception. :lol: They had a very nice house in a :waxer: suburb just northwest of Chicago and he bought her an Atwater Kent radio that looked just like this: Image , which was a big deal at the time, and a Model A Ford, which she learned to drive. That radio sits in my living room today. It hasn't worked for probably 60 years but it makes a lovely end table. Anyway, during Prohibition they made wine in their basement and she would drive it to the restaurant in the back of the Ford. He served it in coffee cups but was eventually was turned in by a competitor and, due to the snitch and the depression, he lost his restaurant and his home. They moved to an apartment and he went to work as a waiter at another restaurant to make ends meet. They raised 3 kids. Their oldest, my favorite uncle, who died 6 years ago next month, went off to war in WWII in Europe and came back without a scratch. His younger brother went to war in Korea and came back without a scratch. Their kid sister, my mom, got married, had my bro and me, got divorced, and raised 2 teenage boys by herself. Grandpa eventually opened another restaurant with my uncle when he came back from Europe and closed it a few years later, just so he could retire on his own terms. Oh, and even though my grandfather was 20 years older than my grandmother, she died first and he was a widow for the next 16 years. He lived with us until he died when I was a young kid. He was the only grandparent I knew but at least I knew him for 5 years.

The only things I know about my paternal grandparents is that my old man's father died of starvation during the Nazi occupation of Greece during the war and his wife died of bone cancer about a decade later, and my old man came here some time in the mid-50's I think.
:wap: Where are these mangos?

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Thu Jun 28, 2018 1:58 pm

Awesome story :wap: !
:sawce:

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Thu Jun 28, 2018 1:59 pm

wap wrote:
Thu Jun 28, 2018 1:53 pm
5/7 thread idea, :sawce: !

I know vastly more about my mother's side so that is the story I'll tell here.

Her father (my grandfather, obviously) who was born around 1885, was a well to do gentleman business owner in the capital town of an idyllic Greek island at the turn of the last century. Horse-drawn carriages, local opera house, casino, top hat, white gloves, etc.
Pic of said town for reference:
Image
Anyway, the town experienced an outbreak of something, I think flu, and a sister died. Since he was single, this prompted him to come to the US to find his brother to let him know. He came through Ellis Island and some years ago we paid for a plaque there with his name on it. This was in 1909. He was a young man and traveled around looking for work and his brother. He took a job working for the railroad and ended up in a town called Prescott, Oregon, on a crew laying down track. Remember, this was a time when the transcontinental RR was still fairly new and was expanding rapidly. He was made a foreman since he could speak English. He did this for a while and eventually ended up in Chicago where his brother was living and he ended up staying. He eventually entered (what else?) the restaurant business and ran a very successful 3 star restaurant in Greektown. We have an old restaurant guide book from the time with a glowing review of his place. Al Capone's sister was a regular. He eventually befriended a family who had a young daughter. He waited for her to grow up and once she became an adult (around 20 yo) they got married in 1925. He was about 20 years older! They had a priest and a bishop at the wedding and rumor has it that the bishop got drunk at the reception. :lol: They had a very nice house in a :waxer: suburb just northwest of Chicago and he bought her an Atwater Kent radio that looked just like this: Image , which was a big deal at the time, and a Model A Ford, which she learned to drive. That radio sits in my living room today. It hasn't worked for probably 60 years but it makes a lovely end table. Anyway, during Prohibition they made wine in their basement and she would drive it to the restaurant in the back of the Ford. He served it in coffee cups but was eventually was turned in by a competitor and, due to the snitch and the depression, he lost his restaurant and his home. They moved to an apartment and he went to work as a waiter at another restaurant to make ends meet. They raised 3 kids. Their oldest, my favorite uncle, who died 6 years ago next month, went off to war in WWII in Europe and came back without a scratch. His younger brother went to war in Korea and came back without a scratch. Their kid sister, my mom, got married, had my bro and me, got divorced, and raised 2 teenage boys by herself. Grandpa eventually opened another restaurant with my uncle when he came back from Europe and closed it a few years later, just so he could retire on his own terms. Oh, and even though my grandfather was 20 years older than my grandmother, she died first and he was a widow for the next 16 years. He lived with us until he died when I was a young kid. He was the only grandparent I knew but at least I knew him for 5 years.

The only things I know about my paternal grandparents is that my old man's father died of starvation during the Nazi occupation of Greece during the war and his wife died of bone cancer about a decade later, and my old man came here some time in the mid-50's I think.
No wonder you're a liberal. :like:

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Thu Jun 28, 2018 2:00 pm

SAWCE wrote:
Thu Jun 28, 2018 1:42 pm
razr390 wrote:
Thu Jun 28, 2018 1:30 pm

5/7

That’s so :fuckyeah:

Can you imagine. If none of this happened as it did you might not have been here as we know you? That’s always the thing that fucks with me hard. Which is why I’m always a bit like “everything happens for a reason” as long as I’m not being an idiot
Oh yeah, 100%. And such small things could have made that change so easy. Either they didn’t convert to Mormonism when it was introduced to them, or they denounced it to save themselves from the concentration camps. Boom. I’d easily have been born in Germany instead of over here.
Yeah, Mormons in Europe in the 30s. Early adopters

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Thu Jun 28, 2018 2:02 pm

SAWCE wrote:Since none of us have made any claims of being 100% Native American, that means that all of our families were at some point immigrants to this fine nation. Do you know the story of how your family came to be here in America (or Canada for Tarspin)? Let's hear them...
Mom's side is Slovak for as far back as we can trace. Dad's side (Great-Grandparents) are both German and Austrian). The Austrian guy came to Slovakia as the Horseman for a Duke who moved to Bratislava. The German side moved to Slovakia four generations ago and bought up large vineyards, they were the wealthy couple with an only son. He got old enough to want to explore, and used his musical and language skills to travel Europe and bang chicks abroad. Tens years went by, and unfortunately both parents passed away and the family fortune was wiped out since nobody tended to the property taxes etc. He lived his remaining years poor AF. Somewhere in that mix is a very small Serbian lady who also moved to Slovakia and settled down.

The parents fell in love at work, got knocked up, shotgun wedding and there i was. We emigrated to Canada when I was two, lived in poverty for about 15 yrs and on a solid footing now. The end.

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Thu Jun 28, 2018 2:25 pm

KYGTIGuy wrote:
Thu Jun 28, 2018 1:59 pm
wap wrote:
Thu Jun 28, 2018 1:53 pm
5/7 thread idea, :sawce: !

I know vastly more about my mother's side so that is the story I'll tell here.

Her father (my grandfather, obviously) who was born around 1885, was a well to do gentleman business owner in the capital town of an idyllic Greek island at the turn of the last century. Horse-drawn carriages, local opera house, casino, top hat, white gloves, etc.
Pic of said town for reference:
Image
Anyway, the town experienced an outbreak of something, I think flu, and a sister died. Since he was single, this prompted him to come to the US to find his brother to let him know. He came through Ellis Island and some years ago we paid for a plaque there with his name on it. This was in 1909. He was a young man and traveled around looking for work and his brother. He took a job working for the railroad and ended up in a town called Prescott, Oregon, on a crew laying down track. Remember, this was a time when the transcontinental RR was still fairly new and was expanding rapidly. He was made a foreman since he could speak English. He did this for a while and eventually ended up in Chicago where his brother was living and he ended up staying. He eventually entered (what else?) the restaurant business and ran a very successful 3 star restaurant in Greektown. We have an old restaurant guide book from the time with a glowing review of his place. Al Capone's sister was a regular. He eventually befriended a family who had a young daughter. He waited for her to grow up and once she became an adult (around 20 yo) they got married in 1925. He was about 20 years older! They had a priest and a bishop at the wedding and rumor has it that the bishop got drunk at the reception. :lol: They had a very nice house in a :waxer: suburb just northwest of Chicago and he bought her an Atwater Kent radio that looked just like this: Image , which was a big deal at the time, and a Model A Ford, which she learned to drive. That radio sits in my living room today. It hasn't worked for probably 60 years but it makes a lovely end table. Anyway, during Prohibition they made wine in their basement and she would drive it to the restaurant in the back of the Ford. He served it in coffee cups but was eventually was turned in by a competitor and, due to the snitch and the depression, he lost his restaurant and his home. They moved to an apartment and he went to work as a waiter at another restaurant to make ends meet. They raised 3 kids. Their oldest, my favorite uncle, who died 6 years ago next month, went off to war in WWII in Europe and came back without a scratch. His younger brother went to war in Korea and came back without a scratch. Their kid sister, my mom, got married, had my bro and me, got divorced, and raised 2 teenage boys by herself. Grandpa eventually opened another restaurant with my uncle when he came back from Europe and closed it a few years later, just so he could retire on his own terms. Oh, and even though my grandfather was 20 years older than my grandmother, she died first and he was a widow for the next 16 years. He lived with us until he died when I was a young kid. He was the only grandparent I knew but at least I knew him for 5 years.

The only things I know about my paternal grandparents is that my old man's father died of starvation during the Nazi occupation of Greece during the war and his wife died of bone cancer about a decade later, and my old man came here some time in the mid-50's I think.
No wonder you're a liberal. :like:
I'm curious to know your thought process that lead from my story to your conclusion. You're right, of course, but I don't see the connection.
:wap: Where are these mangos?

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Thu Jun 28, 2018 2:26 pm

SAWCE wrote:
Thu Jun 28, 2018 1:58 pm
Awesome story :wap: !
Thanks, :sawce: . As was yours!
:wap: Where are these mangos?

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Thu Jun 28, 2018 2:27 pm

KYGTIGuy wrote:
Thu Jun 28, 2018 1:51 pm
Im 95% English according to DNA resluts. My family was in the country before the country existed. Maryland specifically. Came over during the 1600s with the Catholic migration as it was a safe place.

Around the revolutionary was the fan moved to Central KY where there are still a bunch of Catholics.

So I ain't no fucking immigrant, the USA immigrated on me!

No one is native to America. It's just up for debate to who got here first
Is there any debate that Native Americans were here first?
:wap: Where are these mangos?

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Thu Jun 28, 2018 2:30 pm

wap wrote:
Thu Jun 28, 2018 2:27 pm
KYGTIGuy wrote:
Thu Jun 28, 2018 1:51 pm
Im 95% English according to DNA resluts. My family was in the country before the country existed. Maryland specifically. Came over during the 1600s with the Catholic migration as it was a safe place.

Around the revolutionary was the fan moved to Central KY where there are still a bunch of Catholics.

So I ain't no fucking immigrant, the USA immigrated on me!

No one is native to America. It's just up for debate to who got here first
Is there any debate that Native Americans were here first?
White Jesus was here first. Do you even Manifest Destiny, bro?

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Thu Jun 28, 2018 2:31 pm

troyguitar wrote:
Thu Jun 28, 2018 2:30 pm
wap wrote:
Thu Jun 28, 2018 2:27 pm

Is there any debate that Native Americans were here first?
White Jesus was here first. Do you even Manifest Destiny, bro?
Oh right. Of course. :jesus:
:wap: Where are these mangos?

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Thu Jun 28, 2018 2:34 pm

wap wrote:
Thu Jun 28, 2018 2:25 pm
KYGTIGuy wrote:
Thu Jun 28, 2018 1:59 pm


No wonder you're a liberal. :like:
I'm curious to know your thought process that lead from my story to your conclusion. You're right, of course, but I don't see the connection.

I would think it would be difficult to look at the plight of migrants today and not relate with that type of family history.

That alone doesn't make me think your liberal clearly..but still

"Not like the brazen giant of Greek fame,
With conquering limbs astride from land to land;
Here at our sea-washed, sunset gates shall stand
A mighty woman with a torch, whose flame
Is the imprisoned lightning, and her name
Mother of Exiles. From her beacon-hand
Glows world-wide welcome; her mild eyes command
The air-bridged harbor that twin cities frame.
“Keep ancient lands, your storied pomp!” cries she
With silent lips. “Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!”
Last edited by KYGTIGuy on Thu Jun 28, 2018 2:51 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Thu Jun 28, 2018 2:37 pm

wap wrote:
Thu Jun 28, 2018 2:27 pm
KYGTIGuy wrote:
Thu Jun 28, 2018 1:51 pm
Im 95% English according to DNA resluts. My family was in the country before the country existed. Maryland specifically. Came over during the 1600s with the Catholic migration as it was a safe place.

Around the revolutionary was the fan moved to Central KY where there are still a bunch of Catholics.

So I ain't no fucking immigrant, the USA immigrated on me!

No one is native to America. It's just up for debate to who got here first
Is there any debate that Native Americans were here first?
I guess it's semantics on what"native American" means.

No one Climbed out of a tree here like we did in Africa. Clovis people were thought to be the first to cross the land bridge. That's changing doe

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Thu Jun 28, 2018 3:35 pm

KYGTIGuy wrote:
Thu Jun 28, 2018 2:34 pm
wap wrote:
Thu Jun 28, 2018 2:25 pm


I'm curious to know your thought process that lead from my story to your conclusion. You're right, of course, but I don't see the connection.

I would think it would be difficult to look at the plight of migrants today and not relate with that type of family history.

That alone doesn't make me think your liberal clearly..but still

"Not like the brazen giant of Greek fame,
With conquering limbs astride from land to land;
Here at our sea-washed, sunset gates shall stand
A mighty woman with a torch, whose flame
Is the imprisoned lightning, and her name
Mother of Exiles. From her beacon-hand
Glows world-wide welcome; her mild eyes command
The air-bridged harbor that twin cities frame.
“Keep ancient lands, your storied pomp!” cries she
With silent lips. “Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!”
:word:
But it easily could have gone the other way.
"My ancestors came legally, learned the language, got no help from .gov, worked hard, unlike today, blah blah blah."
:wap: Where are these mangos?

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Desertbreh
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Thu Jun 28, 2018 3:37 pm

SAWCE wrote:
Thu Jun 28, 2018 1:05 pm
Since none of us have made any claims of being 100% Native American, that means that all of our families were at some point immigrants to this fine nation. Do you know the story of how your family came to be here in America (or Canada for Tarspin)? Let's hear them...
Reported for starting a thread with too much content.
max225 wrote: You can't "hoon" a pos like that. You can however set up a methlab.

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wap
Chief Master Sirloin of the Wasteful Steak
Chief Master Sirloin of the Wasteful Steak
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Thu Jun 28, 2018 3:38 pm

KYGTIGuy wrote:
Thu Jun 28, 2018 2:37 pm
wap wrote:
Thu Jun 28, 2018 2:27 pm

Is there any debate that Native Americans were here first?
I guess it's semantics on what"native American" means.

No one Climbed out of a tree here like we did in Africa. Clovis people were thought to be the first to cross the land bridge. That's changing doe
Yea the Clovis narrative has been challenged recently.
Regardless, I'd say the decendents of the first humans in the Americas are true Native Americans.
:wap: Where are these mangos?

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wap
Chief Master Sirloin of the Wasteful Steak
Chief Master Sirloin of the Wasteful Steak
Posts: 25287
Joined: Thu Nov 03, 2016 12:52 am
Drives: Mk6Veyron
Location: Pepperland

Thu Jun 28, 2018 3:39 pm

Desertbreh wrote:
Thu Jun 28, 2018 3:37 pm
SAWCE wrote:
Thu Jun 28, 2018 1:05 pm
Since none of us have made any claims of being 100% Native American, that means that all of our families were at some point immigrants to this fine nation. Do you know the story of how your family came to be here in America (or Canada for Tarspin)? Let's hear them...
Reported for starting a thread with too much content.
:lol:
:wap: Where are these mangos?

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