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troyguitar
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Tue Jun 30, 2020 12:43 am

Johnny_P wrote:
Mon Jun 29, 2020 11:03 pm
@troy next major weight item would be wheels. A $500 wheelset set up tubeless would probably drop 2-3 lbs and make a huge difference in the way it accelerates and climbs.
Yeah I know I could drop a lot by doing wheels (and also get sealed cartridge bearings instead of unsealed cup&cone stuff) but I'm probably going to hold off on that until I at least have one of the hubs go bad. Since the wheels are already tubeless compatible, though, I will probably go ahead and try some faster tubeless tires soon. Leaning toward that Maxxis Velocita AR, same 700x40 as my current stuff but tubeless and almost a full pound lighter between the pair, not counting the weight of tubes.

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Tue Jun 30, 2020 1:20 am

Zillon wrote:
Mon Jun 29, 2020 11:59 pm
Johnny_P wrote:
Mon Jun 29, 2020 11:01 pm


Oh sweet. Tuning a front derailleur blows. Have fun. Glad the gearing change is working out though.
I don’t find them to be all that difficult anymore. Align the outer face with the rings, adjust it so it’s 3-5mm off the biggest ring in the lowest position, and set the limits.

There’s a little fine tuning beyond that, but I’ve gotten much better at it over the years.

Shame you’re not closer, :mahtroy: - would be glad to help with setup.
I think I have it adjusted fine now, I just only had like 5 minutes of daylight left earlier to throw it together quickly and do a spin around the block. I'll likely have to mess with it further once I get it out on the road, but for now it's at least going through all the gears fine while upside down in the basement. I wonder if I might need to take a link or two out of the chain :doe: as it seems kind of loose, need to look up what kind of tension it's supposed to have - or really just buy a better derailleur sometime. New old stock 9-speed Deore with 45T capacity is all of like $35 on ebay.

At some point it would be nice to swap bikes with someone who knows :wtf: they're doing though just to see how my shit actually compares to anything else. We don't exactly have :dillerman: offering test drives in town.

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Tue Jun 30, 2020 11:22 am

troyguitar wrote:
Tue Jun 30, 2020 1:20 am
Zillon wrote:
Mon Jun 29, 2020 11:59 pm


I don’t find them to be all that difficult anymore. Align the outer face with the rings, adjust it so it’s 3-5mm off the biggest ring in the lowest position, and set the limits.

There’s a little fine tuning beyond that, but I’ve gotten much better at it over the years.

Shame you’re not closer, :mahtroy: - would be glad to help with setup.
I think I have it adjusted fine now, I just only had like 5 minutes of daylight left earlier to throw it together quickly and do a spin around the block. I'll likely have to mess with it further once I get it out on the road, but for now it's at least going through all the gears fine while upside down in the basement. I wonder if I might need to take a link or two out of the chain :doe: as it seems kind of loose, need to look up what kind of tension it's supposed to have - or really just buy a better derailleur sometime. New old stock 9-speed Deore with 45T capacity is all of like $35 on ebay.

At some point it would be nice to swap bikes with someone who knows :wtf: they're doing though just to see how my shit actually compares to anything else. We don't exactly have :dillerman: offering test drives in town.
In small-small the chain shouldn't be rubbing on itself on the rear derailleur. The derailleur should be fully tucked into itself but without causing the chain on the upper pulley to rub the chain coming back off the lower pulley to the crankset.

In big-big the cage should be nearly fully extended.

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Tue Jun 30, 2020 12:20 pm

Zillon wrote:
Mon Jun 29, 2020 11:59 pm
Johnny_P wrote:
Mon Jun 29, 2020 11:01 pm


Oh sweet. Tuning a front derailleur blows. Have fun. Glad the gearing change is working out though.
I don’t find them to be all that difficult anymore. Align the outer face with the rings, adjust it so it’s 3-5mm off the biggest ring in the lowest position, and set the limits.

There’s a little fine tuning beyond that, but I’ve gotten much better at it over the years.

Shame you’re not closer, :mahtroy: - would be glad to help with setup.
I still haven't ever gotten mine working right, should've taken Johnny up on the offer of facetime tuning, but I'm wasting $75 on the shop tune up (they finally have a slot this week) for wheel truing and hopefully getting that right. To be honest, I really don't miss having the large cog on the front, I just start coasting if I run out of high gears. I'm curious to see if it makes me any faster if they can get it working well.

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Tue Jun 30, 2020 12:23 pm

Image

Today’s ride. I was planning to cross the river and shoot for a 47 mile loop but slept in a little too much :derp:


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Tue Jun 30, 2020 12:27 pm

Johnny_P wrote:
troyguitar wrote:
Tue Jun 30, 2020 1:20 am
I think I have it adjusted fine now, I just only had like 5 minutes of daylight left earlier to throw it together quickly and do a spin around the block. I'll likely have to mess with it further once I get it out on the road, but for now it's at least going through all the gears fine while upside down in the basement. I wonder if I might need to take a link or two out of the chain :doe: as it seems kind of loose, need to look up what kind of tension it's supposed to have - or really just buy a better derailleur sometime. New old stock 9-speed Deore with 45T capacity is all of like $35 on ebay.

At some point it would be nice to swap bikes with someone who knows :wtf: they're doing though just to see how my shit actually compares to anything else. We don't exactly have :dillerman: offering test drives in town.
In small-small the chain shouldn't be rubbing on itself on the rear derailleur. The derailleur should be fully tucked into itself but without causing the chain on the upper pulley to rub the chain coming back off the lower pulley to the crankset.

In big-big the cage should be nearly fully extended.
How far out is fully extended, like no bends at all? I definitely have a lot of room to go. Chain is for sure too long now, on small-small it hits itself.

Last photo is me pulling a bunch on the top to extend the derailleur.

ImageImageImage

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Tue Jun 30, 2020 1:12 pm

Nevermind, that was easy. I took one link out, figured I can take another if needed, and it's perfect on both ends now.

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Tue Jun 30, 2020 1:36 pm

troyguitar wrote:
Tue Jun 30, 2020 1:12 pm
Nevermind, that was easy. I took one link out, figured I can take another if needed, and it's perfect on both ends now.
Yeah I was gonna suggest one link.

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Tue Jun 30, 2020 1:37 pm

D Griff wrote:
Tue Jun 30, 2020 12:23 pm
Image

Today’s ride. I was planning to cross the river and shoot for a 47 mile loop but slept in a little too much :derp:


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Looks like you're a stronger rider than I am at this point. Nice.

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Tue Jun 30, 2020 2:31 pm

First quick test: I definitely need to get a real wrench to fully tighten the BB, I'm getting a number of new ticks/creaks and this is a brand new XT part so that shouldn't happen.

Otherwise shifting is fine and impossible climbs, while still hard, are a little less terrible. Running the same uphill segment today that I started with last week was still hard but I didn't have to stop in the middle and could instead plod along at a cadence of probably like 40 RPM? Really slow but not impossible. I only went 0.4 mph faster, but average heart rate was 148 instead of 173 so I didn't feel like I was going to die at the top.

Moved all the way up from 56th out of 60 all-time to 53rd! I can see how looking at anyone else's Strava segments is a recipe for sadness. Apparently I'm almost the weakest person to have ever gotten on a bike here. :jalepenis:

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Tue Jun 30, 2020 2:39 pm

troyguitar wrote:
Tue Jun 30, 2020 2:31 pm
First quick test: I definitely need to get a real wrench to fully tighten the BB, I'm getting a number of new ticks/creaks and this is a brand new XT part so that shouldn't happen.

Otherwise shifting is fine and impossible climbs, while still hard, are a little less terrible. Running the same uphill segment today that I started with last week was still hard but I didn't have to stop in the middle and could instead plod along at a cadence of probably like 40 RPM? Really slow but not impossible. I only went 0.4 mph faster, but average heart rate was 148 instead of 173 so I didn't feel like I was going to die at the top.

Moved all the way up from 56th out of 60 all-time to 53rd! I can see how looking at anyone else's Strava segments is a recipe for sadness. Apparently I'm almost the weakest person to have ever gotten on a bike here. :jalepenis:
Eh, I still think you're being too hard on yourself. Most people would never use Strava unless they were pretty engaged in cycling. You also have a pretty small sample size in Corning.

I feel like I'm pretty decent now and still typically in the bottom 1/4 on most segments. I think you and I both "suffer" from being on less good bikes than most users as well. On my mountain bike I still suck :doe: and the Orbea is decent... I just have no confidence on trails.

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Tue Jun 30, 2020 2:50 pm

D Griff wrote:
Tue Jun 30, 2020 2:39 pm
troyguitar wrote:
Tue Jun 30, 2020 2:31 pm
First quick test: I definitely need to get a real wrench to fully tighten the BB, I'm getting a number of new ticks/creaks and this is a brand new XT part so that shouldn't happen.

Otherwise shifting is fine and impossible climbs, while still hard, are a little less terrible. Running the same uphill segment today that I started with last week was still hard but I didn't have to stop in the middle and could instead plod along at a cadence of probably like 40 RPM? Really slow but not impossible. I only went 0.4 mph faster, but average heart rate was 148 instead of 173 so I didn't feel like I was going to die at the top.

Moved all the way up from 56th out of 60 all-time to 53rd! I can see how looking at anyone else's Strava segments is a recipe for sadness. Apparently I'm almost the weakest person to have ever gotten on a bike here. :jalepenis:
Eh, I still think you're being too hard on yourself. Most people would never use Strava unless they were pretty engaged in cycling. You also have a pretty small sample size in Corning.

I feel like I'm pretty decent now and still typically in the bottom 1/4 on most segments. I think you and I both "suffer" from being on less good bikes than most users as well. On my mountain bike I still suck :doe: and the Orbea is decent... I just have no confidence on trails.
I don't really care that much except for eventually being able to ride with other people and making sure that I'm not hurting myself. Struggling up the steep shit at 180 bpm and a cadence of near zero might be useful for fitness if you only do it for a very short period of time, but it can't be good to be doing too often - think of it like lifting weights at your highest possible weight to exhaustion. You can't do that constantly, you do it for a few minutes and then rest those muscles for a couple of days. The gear swap seems to have alleviated most of that super hard struggle. Not to mention the fact that it's a lot safer to NOT fall over in the middle of the road due to exhaustion. :derp:

I'm guessing tires will eliminate a lot of the speed gap between me and others who seem to be in similar states of fitness. I have found a number of interwebs tire reviews from people who had the same tires as stock on my bike and changed them for almost anything and they're universally like "these new tires make me feel like a hero, it's like having a permanent tailwind compared to the Nanos" - so apparently I have indeed been handicapping myself due to equipment.

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Tue Jun 30, 2020 3:20 pm

troyguitar wrote:
Tue Jun 30, 2020 2:50 pm
D Griff wrote:
Tue Jun 30, 2020 2:39 pm


Eh, I still think you're being too hard on yourself. Most people would never use Strava unless they were pretty engaged in cycling. You also have a pretty small sample size in Corning.

I feel like I'm pretty decent now and still typically in the bottom 1/4 on most segments. I think you and I both "suffer" from being on less good bikes than most users as well. On my mountain bike I still suck :doe: and the Orbea is decent... I just have no confidence on trails.
I don't really care that much except for eventually being able to ride with other people and making sure that I'm not hurting myself. Struggling up the steep shit at 180 bpm and a cadence of near zero might be useful for fitness if you only do it for a very short period of time, but it can't be good to be doing too often - think of it like lifting weights at your highest possible weight to exhaustion. You can't do that constantly, you do it for a few minutes and then rest those muscles for a couple of days. The gear swap seems to have alleviated most of that super hard struggle. Not to mention the fact that it's a lot safer to NOT fall over in the middle of the road due to exhaustion. :derp:

I'm guessing tires will eliminate a lot of the speed gap between me and others who seem to be in similar states of fitness. I have found a number of interwebs tire reviews from people who had the same tires as stock on my bike and changed them for almost anything and they're universally like "these new tires make me feel like a hero, it's like having a permanent tailwind compared to the Nanos" - so apparently I have indeed been handicapping myself due to equipment.
I believe it on the tires, even a 5 PSI change makes a pretty noticeable difference in effort for me. I'm much quicker in full anus shattering mode.

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Tue Jun 30, 2020 3:37 pm

I'm rolling at 35 psi now because our roads are garbage. Depending on how much more comfy tubeless tires are I might also consider the suspension stem in the future to keep my teeth from being rattled out.

https://redshiftsports.com/shockstop-suspension-stem

:gay: :wasteful: :troywax:

Pretty soon I'll have $1500 into my $500 bike. :fullretard:

Admittedly a lot of that cost is independent of the bike itself. Pedals, shoes, helmet, tools, bags, clothes, etc. all would have been purchased regardless. The only real extra expenses specific to the bike thus far have been on the crank swap and seat+seatpost, so maybe more like $750 into the $500 bike. :math:

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Tue Jun 30, 2020 3:46 pm

troyguitar wrote:
Tue Jun 30, 2020 3:37 pm
I'm rolling at 35 psi now because our roads are garbage. Depending on how much more comfy tubeless tires are I might also consider the suspension stem in the future to keep my teeth from being rattled out.

https://redshiftsports.com/shockstop-suspension-stem

:gay: :wasteful: :troywax:

Pretty soon I'll have $1500 into my $500 bike. :fullretard:
Tubeless won't be radically different if you're already running at 35 PSI. If the tires and rims are tubeless ready (TLR generally is the badging) then you might as well just do it for the weight savings. Warning, it can be a real pain in the ass. I think you have WTB rims? If so, they have bead retention ridges in the rim that lock the tire on. You can go stupid low with that and not worry about the tire pinch flatting the tube. On older systems if you went too low, the tire could pull away from the rim slightly when you went around a turn, the tube would fill the void, and when you straightened back out the tire went back to where it was supposed to go and BAM! FLAT.

I run 25-30 front 35 rear on my nanos. If I am doing all dirt I might go 5 lower.

If youre doing all this you could get tires that have a less aggressive tread and a more supple casing as well. Like a Compass Barlow Pass or something.

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Tue Jun 30, 2020 3:56 pm

Johnny_P wrote:
Tue Jun 30, 2020 3:46 pm
troyguitar wrote:
Tue Jun 30, 2020 3:37 pm
I'm rolling at 35 psi now because our roads are garbage. Depending on how much more comfy tubeless tires are I might also consider the suspension stem in the future to keep my teeth from being rattled out.

https://redshiftsports.com/shockstop-suspension-stem

:gay: :wasteful: :troywax:

Pretty soon I'll have $1500 into my $500 bike. :fullretard:
Tubeless won't be radically different if you're already running at 35 PSI. If the tires and rims are tubeless ready (TLR generally is the badging) then you might as well just do it for the weight savings. Warning, it can be a real pain in the ass. I think you have WTB rims? If so, they have bead retention ridges in the rim that lock the tire on. You can go stupid low with that and not worry about the tire pinch flatting the tube. On older systems if you went too low, the tire could pull away from the rim slightly when you went around a turn, the tube would fill the void, and when you straightened back out the tire went back to where it was supposed to go and BAM! FLAT.

I run 25-30 front 35 rear on my nanos. If I am doing all dirt I might go 5 lower.

If youre doing all this you could get tires that have a less aggressive tread and a more supple casing as well. Like a Compass Barlow Pass or something.
I have the super basic $29 Nanos that are supposedly not able to be run tubeless, the wheels are compatible :doe:

It looks like I'll need tires and valve stems, plus maybe tape depending on what's already installed. I'm leaning toward the Maxxis semi-slick "adventure" tire. 380g each vs 550+tubes ought to be a huge difference based on weight alone, plus the faster rolling aspect.

https://www.competitivecyclist.com/maxx ... e-tubeless

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Tue Jun 30, 2020 3:57 pm

Cross bike was stupid fun in the wiss last week. I need to do that again. Full on mountain bike trails. Everyone I came across was like :wtf: you're riding a road bike on these trails? :fuckyeah: :datass:

I can huck this thing up and over a lot of stuff now. I actually think I can loft it better than the MTB due to no suspension fork.

Tires though. Yeah I'm going to need new tires by the end of the year. The Nanos I have are wearing down fast. Not sure what I'd replace with.

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Tue Jun 30, 2020 3:59 pm

FWIW in all of my research it seems like the Resolute is the better younger brother to the Nano. I keep thinking about trying that one instead, but kinda want to try something more slick just to experience the difference.

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Tue Jun 30, 2020 4:00 pm

Do the tires y'all run have really stiff sidewalls? I feel like if I dropped down low like that I would be slow as hell, I run 80 rear and 70 front on my Contis, I will drop them down to 60ish if I'm going "off road" or cruising somewhere with shit roads/sidewalk.

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Tue Jun 30, 2020 4:02 pm

D Griff wrote:
Tue Jun 30, 2020 4:00 pm
Do the tires y'all run have really stiff sidewalls? I feel like if I dropped down low like that I would be slow as hell, I run 80 rear and 70 front on my Contis, I will drop them down to 60ish if I'm going "off road" or cruising somewhere with shit roads/sidewalk.
Our tires are 40mm wide so even at 35 psi there's a lot of air in there. You're probably on 23 or 25mm right?

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Tue Jun 30, 2020 4:04 pm

troyguitar wrote:
Tue Jun 30, 2020 3:56 pm
Johnny_P wrote:
Tue Jun 30, 2020 3:46 pm


Tubeless won't be radically different if you're already running at 35 PSI. If the tires and rims are tubeless ready (TLR generally is the badging) then you might as well just do it for the weight savings. Warning, it can be a real pain in the ass. I think you have WTB rims? If so, they have bead retention ridges in the rim that lock the tire on. You can go stupid low with that and not worry about the tire pinch flatting the tube. On older systems if you went too low, the tire could pull away from the rim slightly when you went around a turn, the tube would fill the void, and when you straightened back out the tire went back to where it was supposed to go and BAM! FLAT.

I run 25-30 front 35 rear on my nanos. If I am doing all dirt I might go 5 lower.

If youre doing all this you could get tires that have a less aggressive tread and a more supple casing as well. Like a Compass Barlow Pass or something.
I have the super basic $29 Nanos that are supposedly not able to be run tubeless, the wheels are compatible :doe:

It looks like I'll need tires and valve stems, plus maybe tape depending on what's already installed. I'm leaning toward the Maxxis semi-slick "adventure" tire. 380g each vs 550+tubes ought to be a huge difference based on weight alone, plus the faster rolling aspect.

https://www.competitivecyclist.com/maxx ... e-tubeless
Those look good. Some of the weight comes back in the form of valve stems and sealant which is basically water. But you do save a bit. The fatter the tire the more you save.

I wouldn't try tubeless on those nanos. I guess its possible but likely that it'll just make a huge mess and not work. Don't buy any tire listed as "UST" as it won't work with the WTB rims. You'll need tape (Stan's works well, WTB's website can help you figure out the width you need), and sealant (which I also just use Stan's. Some swear by Orange Seal, but to me it's really all the same in that it works sometimes, and Stan's is a hell of a lot cheaper.) One wrap of tape with 6" or so of overlap at the valve core area, and a hefty dose of sealant, and you're done. Do it outside so if/when you make a mess it's easier to clean up. Seating a tubeless tire sounds like a gunshot so def don't do that indoors either.

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Tue Jun 30, 2020 4:05 pm

troyguitar wrote:
Tue Jun 30, 2020 4:02 pm
D Griff wrote:
Tue Jun 30, 2020 4:00 pm
Do the tires y'all run have really stiff sidewalls? I feel like if I dropped down low like that I would be slow as hell, I run 80 rear and 70 front on my Contis, I will drop them down to 60ish if I'm going "off road" or cruising somewhere with shit roads/sidewalk.
Our tires are 40mm wide so even at 35 psi there's a lot of air in there. You're probably on 23 or 25mm right?
27X1.25, so 32 MM I guess. :wap: bike tires were sized that way.

I have these: https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B01 ... UTF8&psc=1

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Tue Jun 30, 2020 4:05 pm

troyguitar wrote:
Tue Jun 30, 2020 3:59 pm
FWIW in all of my research it seems like the Resolute is the better younger brother to the Nano. I keep thinking about trying that one instead, but kinda want to try something more slick just to experience the difference.
My friends ride them. They're fragile tires. But they seem to like them overall.

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Tue Jun 30, 2020 4:07 pm

D Griff wrote:
Tue Jun 30, 2020 4:00 pm
Do the tires y'all run have really stiff sidewalls? I feel like if I dropped down low like that I would be slow as hell, I run 80 rear and 70 front on my Contis, I will drop them down to 60ish if I'm going "off road" or cruising somewhere with shit roads/sidewalk.
They're just a lot fatter, more volume means more contact patch so you need less pressure to support you.

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Tue Jun 30, 2020 4:07 pm

D Griff wrote:
Tue Jun 30, 2020 4:00 pm
Do the tires y'all run have really stiff sidewalls? I feel like if I dropped down low like that I would be slow as hell, I run 80 rear and 70 front on my Contis, I will drop them down to 60ish if I'm going "off road" or cruising somewhere with shit roads/sidewalk.
Fatter tires can run lower pressures due to air volume.

On a 25C I run 95-100 PSI, on the 32C I run 65-70.
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